Mill Prong House Tour, Part 3

The rear stairs on the back porch are the only access to the second floor of Mill Prong House. Room Six at the front on the second floor is the most ambitiously decorated room in the house and is painted in four colors.
The rear stairs on the back porch are the only access to the second floor of Mill Prong House. Room Six on the second floor is the most ambitiously decorated room in the house, painted in four colors.
The two shed rooms at the rear of the first floor have flush (even) boards but lack the heavy cornices between the ceiling and the wall of the two front rooms.

Likewise the back porch has flush (even) boards.

The shed room to the left contains an interior door connecting to the front rooms.

The other shed room across the porch did not have any access into the main house. It has only an exterior door and is called the "peddler's room."

Travelers could stay in the peddler's room and be kept apart from the family at night.

The open stair leading from the rear porch to the rooms above is unusual. The stairwell goes in a straight direction from the back porch to the rooms above.

Before the remodeling in the 1830's, the stairwell turned to the right after rising from the back porch, appeared as an enclosed stairwell in Room One, with a landing in Room Five on the second floor.

Since the Scots settling the area came from Argyle, a second floor Argyle room is set up complete with clan flags of families from the area.
Since the Scots settling the area came from Argyle, a second floor Argyle room is set up complete with clan flags of families from the area.

An exterior stairway to the second floor was also used in the McEachern house about a mile distant from Mill Prong House.

The exterior stair is also found as far away as Bath in Beaufort County.

The 1790 Vandeveer House in Bath has a similar open stair arrangement in the two rooms opening on the rear porch as Mill Prong House does.

Room Five

Originally the two upstairs rooms on the front were built so the room at the top of the stairs opened out on the second-floor porch.

During the remodeling in the 1830s, a plaster wall was installed dividing this room into a center hall and a bedroom.

From the cuts in the floor boards you can see where the original stairwell was located in this room.

Since the Scots settling the area came from Argyle, a second floor Argyle room is set up complete with clan flags of families from the area.

Anyone with a Scottish name in his background is encouraged to sign his or her name under his clan name in the clan registers provided.

Room Six

Room Six at the front on the second floor was untouched by the remodeling in the 1830s. It is the most ambitiously decorated room in the house and is painted in four colors.

The panel sections in the baseboard are brown, the upper walls are blue-green, the mantle and the baseboards are black and the rails, styles and chair rails are all red-brown.

The kitchen building at Mill Prong was used for cooking and dining.
The kitchen building at Mill Prong was used for cooking and dining.

Rooms Seven and Eight

In the 1830s a portion of the rear wall on the second floor was removed and a hallway was extended over the rear porch.

A bedroom was built over each of the shed rooms below and each of these rooms were plastered. You can see the handcut wooden lath over which the plaster was laid.

The material used in the remodeling was not as desirable as the original wood as there has been more deterioration in the newer section than in the older area.

Archibald McEachern, who remodeled Mill Prong House in the 1830s, was prominent in the affairs of the area and served as a major in the militia.

At the time of the Civil War, McEachern maintained Mill Prong as the center of a 2,500-acre plantation with more than 40 slaves growing wheat, corn, rye, oats, peas, beans and potatoes, together with valuable livestock.

Kitchen Building

The kitchen building was originally a residence probably built in the second quarter of the 19th Century and moved to Mill Prong for use as a kitchen and dining room.

It was originally connected to the main house by walkway.

The kitchen building is now remodeled as a caretaker kitchen and bathroom facility also featuring introductory exhibits to Mill Prong.

It has the only bathroom facility at Mill Prong House.